Res Ipsa Babouche Slippers: WFH Like a 17th Century French Monarch

If you've ever shopped in one of our retail stores...or if you happen to be a French royalist or long lost heir to the throne, you may recognize our latest design. Outrageously stylish and cool, not to mention perhaps the most acceptable house shoes, our Moroccan babouche slippers for men and women are now available online. Sustainably designed from repurposed boucherouite rugs, the slippers have an impeccable pedigree and are perfect for home use. 

Res Ipsa

During this period of uncertainty that has only just begun, we're inspired to make working from home fashionable and productive. Of all our one-of-a-kind products, our Moroccan babouche slipper is the go-to shoe to elevate your WFH attire with a dramatic sense of color, comfort and creativity —not to mention fun
 
Res Ipsa Moroccan Babouche Slipper
Res Ipsa Moroccan Babouche Slipper
Our men’s and women’s Moroccan babouche slippers are handmade in our atelier in Marrakech, Morocco. The Moroccan babouche slipper derives from the Arabic 'babush' or Persian 'papush'. 
 
Instead of using traditional wool to weave the rugs, women in Morocco’s Atlas Mountain region weave together these yarn rugs from recycled carpets, wool, cotton, nylon, and plastic from shipping bags and packaging material to create beautiful rugs. This new practice began around the middle of 20th century. We in turn source worn and old rugs to make these colorful one-of-kind slippers.
 
Boucherouite Rugs
Our babouches are doubly-sustainable: boucherouites are repurposed from old textiles, and when they wear out we repurpose them into something new! Each pair is one-of-a-kind and the iconic open-back sandal design is said to reflect the fact that its wearers (often monarchs and 17th century French courtiers) lived a luxurious lifestyle.
 

17th Century France

Fig. 1 - Jan Frans van Douven (Southern Netherlandish, 1656-1727). Anna Maria Luisa de’ Medici dancing with her husband Johann Wilhelm, Elector Palatine, 1695. Oil on canvas. Private Collection

17th Century France

Louis XIV and His Family, oil painting by Nicolas de Largillière, 1711; in the Wallace Collection, London. Reproduced by permission of the trustees of the Wallace Collection, London; photograph, J.R. Freeman & Co. Ltd.
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